Discussion:
Repercussions of the death of Diana, Princess of Wales
(too old to reply)
Andy
2007-08-31 00:50:20 UTC
Permalink
Repercussions of the death of Diana, Princess of Wales

As I write this it is almost precisely ten years since the death of
Diana, Princess of Wales. Some say it is time for Britain to "get
over" this- but without wanting to sound sentimental, I don't believe
as a nation we ever will.
What made Diana unique amongst her generation was her ability to
transcend traditional divides, such as class, ethnicity, religion and
disability. One of the very few people able to "walk with kings but
keep the common touch". Though deeply flawed, and perhaps because of
it, she somehow managed to embody the aspirations of the country in a
single person. No one since has managed to fill this "keystone"
identity, a crucial part of uniting a diverse population.
The mystery surrounding her death has similar repercussions. Whatever
views one holds on this, from tragic accident to assassination, one
thing is certain. A lot of people no longer trust the establishment's
version of events, and while this is not necessarily a bad thing in
itself, the knock on effect has been a loss of trust in people in
general. It is after all, trust, that binds a civilised society
together.
This situation in many ways echoes the effects seen in America
following the shooting of John F Kennedy. What was lost on 31st August
1997 was not just a charismatic personality, but a nation's innocence.
Roger Dewhurst
2007-08-31 02:19:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy
Repercussions of the death of Diana, Princess of Wales
As I write this it is almost precisely ten years since the death of
Diana, Princess of Wales. Some say it is time for Britain to "get
over" this- but without wanting to sound sentimental, I don't believe
as a nation we ever will.
What made Diana unique amongst her generation was her ability to
transcend traditional divides, such as class, ethnicity, religion and
disability. One of the very few people able to "walk with kings but
keep the common touch". Though deeply flawed, and perhaps because of
it, she somehow managed to embody the aspirations of the country in a
single person. No one since has managed to fill this "keystone"
identity, a crucial part of uniting a diverse population.
The mystery surrounding her death has similar repercussions. Whatever
views one holds on this, from tragic accident to assassination, one
thing is certain. A lot of people no longer trust the establishment's
version of events, and while this is not necessarily a bad thing in
itself, the knock on effect has been a loss of trust in people in
general. It is after all, trust, that binds a civilised society
together.
This situation in many ways echoes the effects seen in America
following the shooting of John F Kennedy. What was lost on 31st August
1997 was not just a charismatic personality, but a nation's innocence.
What load of touchy-feely PC nonsense.

R
crazyhorse
2007-08-31 08:27:11 UTC
Permalink
abelard
2007-08-31 14:15:02 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 01:27:11 -0700, crazyhorse
What all these pathetic people seem to forget is that before her death
she was a figure of ridicule, maybe through media jealousy, but that
is what drives them.
My mother in law decided to subscribe to the Daily Mail the week
before Diana died. I know this because we were visiting and I took
great delight in slagging off that particular toilet paper. One day's
front page was particularly memorable as it had a large banner
headline stating that "Di" (the press are always on nickname terms
with the rich and famous) had been photographed in some French
Mediterranean resort wearing a sun-dress that could be bought for
around £15 in C&A's.
There were also around 3 or 4 inside pages devoted to this subject,
with various hacks taking their turn to slag her off.
of course they were....they're rather like you....
envious and mean spirited....
--
web site at www.abelard.org - news comment service, logic, economics
energy, education, politics, etc 1,552,396 document calls in year past
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
all that is necessary for [] walk quietly and carry
the triumph of evil is that [] a big stick.
good people do nothing [] trust actions not words
only when it's funny -- roger rabbit
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
dangdangdoodIe
2007-08-31 19:36:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by abelard
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 01:27:11 -0700, crazyhorse
What all these pathetic people seem to forget is that before her death
she was a figure of ridicule, maybe through media jealousy, but that
is what drives them.
My mother in law decided to subscribe to the Daily Mail the week
before Diana died. I know this because we were visiting and I took
great delight in slagging off that particular toilet paper. One day's
front page was particularly memorable as it had a large banner
headline stating that "Di" (the press are always on nickname terms
with the rich and famous) had been photographed in some French
Mediterranean resort wearing a sun-dress that could be bought for
around £15 in C&A's.
There were also around 3 or 4 inside pages devoted to this subject,
with various hacks taking their turn to slag her off.
of course they were....they're rather like you....
envious and mean spirited....
and sick
--
the dang
Ariadne
2007-08-31 23:48:51 UTC
Permalink
Dead Paul
2007-08-31 10:07:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roger Dewhurst
Post by Andy
Repercussions of the death of Diana, Princess of Wales
As I write this it is almost precisely ten years since the death of
Diana, Princess of Wales. Some say it is time for Britain to "get over"
this- but without wanting to sound sentimental, I don't believe as a
nation we ever will.
What made Diana unique amongst her generation was her ability to
transcend traditional divides, such as class, ethnicity, religion and
disability. One of the very few people able to "walk with kings but keep
the common touch". Though deeply flawed, and perhaps because of it, she
somehow managed to embody the aspirations of the country in a single
person. No one since has managed to fill this "keystone" identity, a
crucial part of uniting a diverse population. The mystery surrounding
her death has similar repercussions. Whatever views one holds on this,
from tragic accident to assassination, one thing is certain. A lot of
people no longer trust the establishment's version of events, and while
this is not necessarily a bad thing in itself, the knock on effect has
been a loss of trust in people in general. It is after all, trust, that
binds a civilised society together.
This situation in many ways echoes the effects seen in America following
the shooting of John F Kennedy. What was lost on 31st August 1997 was
not just a charismatic personality, but a nation's innocence.
What load of touchy-feely PC nonsense.
touchy-feely yes but PC?

I think you'll find that the PC brigade do not want or encourage any of
this Diana imortalisation stuff. PC is establisment led/driven. PC is
about social engineering and indoctrination. It's not about you letting it
all hang out.
Post by Roger Dewhurst
R
--
___ _______ ___ ___ ___ __ ____
/ _ \/ __/ _ | / _ \ / _ \/ _ |/ / / / /
/ // / _// __ |/ // / / ___/ __ / /_/ / /__
/____/___/_/ |_/____/ /_/ /_/ |_\____/____/
Maria
2007-08-31 10:41:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roger Dewhurst
Post by Andy
Repercussions of the death of Diana, Princess of Wales
As I write this it is almost precisely ten years since the death of
Diana, Princess of Wales. Some say it is time for Britain to "get
over" this- but without wanting to sound sentimental, I don't believe
as a nation we ever will.
What made Diana unique amongst her generation was her ability to
transcend traditional divides, such as class, ethnicity, religion and
disability. One of the very few people able to "walk with kings but
keep the common touch". Though deeply flawed, and perhaps because of
it, she somehow managed to embody the aspirations of the country in a
single person. No one since has managed to fill this "keystone"
identity, a crucial part of uniting a diverse population.
The mystery surrounding her death has similar repercussions. Whatever
views one holds on this, from tragic accident to assassination, one
thing is certain. A lot of people no longer trust the establishment's
version of events, and while this is not necessarily a bad thing in
itself, the knock on effect has been a loss of trust in people in
general. It is after all, trust, that binds a civilised society
together.
This situation in many ways echoes the effects seen in America
following the shooting of John F Kennedy. What was lost on 31st August
1997 was not just a charismatic personality, but a nation's innocence.
What load of touchy-feely PC nonsense.
Reads that way yes, but IMHO the author has a point which has not been
made - we are extremely (and damagingly IMV) disconnected from the
establishment in this country, a tradition which this woman broke by
actually not being afraid to mix and bond with the plebs. She
connected 'us' to 'them. That is the only explanation I can find for
the incredible outpouring of grief when she died - it was not the
death of the woman per se, but also the death of an era when we could
actually feel that Royalty and the establishment really had something
to do with us and that we were not just political nonentities. That
she became a figure of ridicule also proves that - you are not
accepted in this common society unless we are comfortable enough to
ridicule you! Since her death, things have predictably and
depressingly returned to normal, with them being so way above us that
we will never matter.

What a horrid country this is (wrt the contempt the establishment
holds for the people I mean).
Andrew Thomas
2007-08-31 10:44:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Maria
What a horrid country this is (wrt the contempt the establishment
holds for the people I mean).
That's only one very minor reason that this country is so horrid. By
the by, the contempt felt by the establishment for the people is well
matched by the contempt felt by the people for the establishment.
They hate "us", and "we" hate them. Kind up sums up the place,
really.
Maria
2007-08-31 10:54:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Thomas
Post by Maria
What a horrid country this is (wrt the contempt the establishment
holds for the people I mean).
That's only one very minor reason that this country is so horrid. By
the by, the contempt felt by the establishment for the people is well
matched by the contempt felt by the people for the establishment.
They hate "us", and "we" hate them. Kind up sums up the place,
really.
No that minor - it is because of this remoteness that they think they
can do what they like once they achieve power and accounts for an
awful lot of bad poliocy which has been allowed to destroy this
country.
j***@hushmail.com
2007-08-31 11:01:58 UTC
Permalink
[Diana drivel]
Post by Maria
Post by Roger Dewhurst
What load of touchy-feely PC nonsense.
Reads that way yes, but IMHO the author has a point which has not been
made - we are extremely (and damagingly IMV) disconnected from the
establishment in this country, a tradition which this woman broke by
actually not being afraid to mix and bond with the plebs. She
connected 'us' to 'them. That is the only explanation I can find for
the incredible outpouring of grief when she died - it was not the
death of the woman per se, but also the death of an era when we could
actually feel that Royalty and the establishment really had something
to do with us and that we were not just political nonentities. That
she became a figure of ridicule also proves that - you are not
accepted in this common society unless we are comfortable enough to
ridicule you! Since her death, things have predictably and
depressingly returned to normal, with them being so way above us that
we will never matter.
What a horrid country this is (wrt the contempt the establishment
holds for the people I mean).- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
I personally could never see what all the fuss was about; to me and
most of my contemporaries, the Royal Family and all its doings was
always a bit of a joke, and the Diana episode did nothing to dispel
that view. She was a silly bimbo who married far too young, and for
all the wrong reasons; he was a repressed, slightly dim, anachronism.
I never saw the wedding as a fairy tale, nor the death as anything
other than a tragic accident.

The 'outpouring of grief' represented nothing more or less than the
underlying sentimentality of much of the female and gay populace,
stirred up by the press and Tony Blair, who saw it as a good
opportunity to show his 'caring side'.

It's also worth getting a bit of historical perspective on the whole
thing; to my mother, the events of Edward VIII's abdication were still
quite fresh in her mind, but far from siding with the King who gave up
his throne for lurve, she sympathised with his brother, who was, in
effect, forced to become King.
Andy
2007-08-31 12:17:02 UTC
Permalink
On 31 Aug, 11:41, Maria <***@tajarts.co.uk> wrote:
"She connected 'us' to 'them." That is the only explanation I can find
for
the incredible outpouring of grief when she died - it was not the
death of the woman per se, but also the death of an era when we could
actually feel that Royalty and the establishment really had something
to do with us and that we were not just political nonentities."

This is exactly the point. Diana was no saint, nor was she a rocket
scientist, but she was a bridge linking the very top of society with
the very bottom. Most countries around the world (including the UK)
spend most of the time deeply divided over issues such as politics and
class. The last few years of Diana's life marked a rare period in
history when almost EVERYONE could feel British- this feeling was
dubbed "cool brittania" by much of the media.
I was never a great fan of Diana during her lifetime myself, but the
huge genuine sorrow felt by so many at at her demise prompted me to
question what made her so special, as to recieve the sort of send off
usually reserved for heads of state.

I often wonder what would of happened if JFK hadn't been shot. Would
there have been a utopian America, a global nuclear war, of would
history have unfolded little differently. African-Americans ask
similiar questions about Martin Luther King, and Indians/Pakistanis
the same about Gandhi. All these people offered a short window of time
when "revolution was in the air". The essence of life itself is the
"hope and desire for change". Without such hope, we are essentially
living dead.

The Britain I see today is a divided, cynical place lacking confidence
in itself or a sense of direction. To some extent you could blame the
party of government, but none of the other parties, mainstream or
fringe, have any "vision" of where we're actually going. It's the
people themselves, myself included, who have lost heart. Diana was
dubbed "The Princess Of Hearts", and to me her loss that contributed
to the situation we have today, of a country going through the
motions, but with our heart not really in it.
jb
2007-08-31 12:26:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy
"She connected 'us' to 'them." That is the only explanation I can find
for
the incredible outpouring of grief when she died -
Oh do behave!
She was as shallow as any character out of Eastenders and like any character
out of any soap the outpourings of grief when they pop their clogs are
incredible.

Incredible that any sane person would ever coun tenance it.

ISTR bugger answering questions in the house about some non existent fantasy
being locked up for something or other.
When that happens you know the inmates have taken charge of the asylum.
abelard
2007-08-31 14:17:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by jb
Post by Andy
"She connected 'us' to 'them." That is the only explanation I can find
for
the incredible outpouring of grief when she died -
Oh do behave!
She was as shallow as any character out of Eastenders and like any character
out of any soap the outpourings of grief when they pop their clogs are
incredible.
i'm interested to see you in the gathering of the faux-sophisticated..
Post by jb
Incredible that any sane person would ever coun tenance it.
ISTR bugger answering questions in the house about some non existent fantasy
being locked up for something or other.
When that happens you know the inmates have taken charge of the asylum.
--
web site at www.abelard.org - news comment service, logic, economics
energy, education, politics, etc 1,552,396 document calls in year past
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
all that is necessary for [] walk quietly and carry
the triumph of evil is that [] a big stick.
good people do nothing [] trust actions not words
only when it's funny -- roger rabbit
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
John of Aix
2007-08-31 12:20:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Maria
Post by Roger Dewhurst
Post by Andy
Repercussions of the death of Diana, Princess of Wales
As I write this it is almost precisely ten years since the death of
Diana, Princess of Wales. Some say it is time for Britain to "get
over" this- but without wanting to sound sentimental, I don't
believe as a nation we ever will.
What made Diana unique amongst her generation was her ability to
transcend traditional divides, such as class, ethnicity, religion
and disability. One of the very few people able to "walk with kings
but keep the common touch". Though deeply flawed, and perhaps
because of it, she somehow managed to embody the aspirations of the
country in a single person. No one since has managed to fill this
"keystone" identity, a crucial part of uniting a diverse population.
The mystery surrounding her death has similar repercussions.
Whatever views one holds on this, from tragic accident to
assassination, one thing is certain. A lot of people no longer
trust the establishment's version of events, and while this is not
necessarily a bad thing in itself, the knock on effect has been a
loss of trust in people in general. It is after all, trust, that
binds a civilised society together.
This situation in many ways echoes the effects seen in America
following the shooting of John F Kennedy. What was lost on 31st
August 1997 was not just a charismatic personality, but a nation's
innocence.
What load of touchy-feely PC nonsense.
Reads that way yes, but IMHO the author has a point which has not been
made - we are extremely (and damagingly IMV) disconnected from the
establishment in this country, a tradition which this woman broke by
actually not being afraid to mix and bond with the plebs. She
connected 'us' to 'them.
Like the la te Quuen mother in the East End during WWII you mean.
Diana did not 'connect with the plebs' she wa sincapable of doing so by
her uprbringing and the world she lived in, she just did the rounds of
'good works like all the other 'royals', the only difference is the
choices she made for her support.
Post by Maria
That is the only explanation I can find for
the incredible outpouring of grief when she died - it was not the
death of the woman per se, but also the death of an era when we could
actually feel that Royalty and the establishment really had something
to do with us and that we were not just political nonentities.
Balderdash. The outpouring of grief like the laying of flowers after any
event, accident, loss of a five pound note is simply a sign of the
current imbecilirty of a majority of British people by reason of your
woeful medai and its appeal to the lowest common denominator.
John of Aix
2007-08-31 08:44:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roger Dewhurst
Post by Andy
Repercussions of the death of Diana, Princess of Wales
As I write this it is almost precisely ten years since the death of
Diana, Princess of Wales. Some say it is time for Britain to "get
over" this- but without wanting to sound sentimental, I don't believe
as a nation we ever will.
What made Diana unique amongst her generation was her ability to
transcend traditional divides, such as class, ethnicity, religion and
disability. One of the very few people able to "walk with kings but
keep the common touch". Though deeply flawed, and perhaps because of
it, she somehow managed to embody the aspirations of the country in a
single person. No one since has managed to fill this "keystone"
identity, a crucial part of uniting a diverse population.
The mystery surrounding her death has similar repercussions. Whatever
views one holds on this, from tragic accident to assassination, one
thing is certain. A lot of people no longer trust the establishment's
version of events, and while this is not necessarily a bad thing in
itself, the knock on effect has been a loss of trust in people in
general. It is after all, trust, that binds a civilised society
together.
This situation in many ways echoes the effects seen in America
following the shooting of John F Kennedy. What was lost on 31st
August 1997 was not just a charismatic personality, but a nation's
innocence.
What load of touchy-feely PC nonsense.
That seems like a pretty good analysis to me.
abelard
2007-08-31 14:21:22 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 10:44:28 +0200, "John of Aix"
Post by John of Aix
Post by Roger Dewhurst
What load of touchy-feely PC nonsense.
That seems like a pretty good analysis to me.
and now we have another pair of bitter old men on parade
sorry....on slouch
--
web site at www.abelard.org - news comment service, logic, economics
energy, education, politics, etc 1,552,396 document calls in year past
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
all that is necessary for [] walk quietly and carry
the triumph of evil is that [] a big stick.
good people do nothing [] trust actions not words
only when it's funny -- roger rabbit
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
FACE
2007-08-31 15:22:15 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 16:21:22 +0200, in uk.politics.misc abelard
Post by abelard
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 10:44:28 +0200, "John of Aix"
Post by John of Aix
Post by Roger Dewhurst
What load of touchy-feely PC nonsense.
That seems like a pretty good analysis to me.
and now we have another pair of bitter old men on parade
sorry....on slouch
When Diana died, George Will wrote in regard to the orgiastic outpouring of grief
that in a year, everyone would look back and ask "now what was that all about'.

I think he was right...............

There was also a similar rending and sackcloth response to the beheading of Kenneth
Bigley to the point of embarrassment for many.

I think that 'send a teddy bear' has become a bit of a sarcastic joke. (One almost
on par with 'if it saves one child' which you may have seen was actually used in
seriousness in a post here yesterday.)

FACE
abelard
2007-08-31 16:02:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by FACE
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 16:21:22 +0200, in uk.politics.misc abelard
Post by abelard
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 10:44:28 +0200, "John of Aix"
Post by John of Aix
Post by Roger Dewhurst
What load of touchy-feely PC nonsense.
That seems like a pretty good analysis to me.
and now we have another pair of bitter old men on parade
sorry....on slouch
When Diana died, George Will wrote in regard to the orgiastic outpouring of grief
that in a year, everyone would look back and ask "now what was that all about'.
I think he was right...............
There was also a similar rending and sackcloth response to the beheading of Kenneth
Bigley to the point of embarrassment for many.
I think that 'send a teddy bear' has become a bit of a sarcastic joke. (One almost
on par with 'if it saves one child' which you may have seen was actually used in
seriousness in a post here yesterday.)
oh, the 'outpouring' is pretty obvious and natural...
a matter of identification with an intelligent, sensitive and not ugly
female who escaped the control of a dull, unimaginative, ugly oaf

a person in a position of fame who independently bothered with the
oppressed despite her own difficulties....
who tended to be able and bothered to present herself well....

which person makes you feel better at the cashout?
the friendly well turned out one...or the fat, miserable and slovenly
dressed one...

those who aspire, naturally were upset by her departure...

just as naturally the whiners and failures of this world were/are
envious of the admiration she attracted....

regards
--
web site at www.abelard.org - news comment service, logic, economics
energy, education, politics, etc 1,552,396 document calls in year past
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
all that is necessary for [] walk quietly and carry
the triumph of evil is that [] a big stick.
good people do nothing [] trust actions not words
only when it's funny -- roger rabbit
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
joeh
2007-08-31 19:52:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by abelard
Post by FACE
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 16:21:22 +0200, in uk.politics.misc abelard
Post by abelard
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 10:44:28 +0200, "John of Aix"
Post by John of Aix
Post by Roger Dewhurst
What load of touchy-feely PC nonsense.
That seems like a pretty good analysis to me.
and now we have another pair of bitter old men on parade
sorry....on slouch
When Diana died, George Will wrote in regard to the orgiastic outpouring of grief
that in a year, everyone would look back and ask "now what was that all about'.
I think he was right...............
There was also a similar rending and sackcloth response to the beheading of Kenneth
Bigley to the point of embarrassment for many.
I think that 'send a teddy bear' has become a bit of a sarcastic joke. (One almost
on par with 'if it saves one child' which you may have seen was actually used in
seriousness in a post here yesterday.)
oh, the 'outpouring' is pretty obvious and natural...
a matter of identification with an intelligent, sensitive and not ugly
female who escaped the control of a dull, unimaginative, ugly oaf
<takes out and peels small onion>
Post by abelard
a person in a position of fame who independently bothered with the
oppressed despite her own difficulties....
who tended to be able and bothered to present herself well....
<places violin under chin plays sentimental tune>
Post by abelard
which person makes you feel better at the cashout?
the friendly well turned out one...or the fat, miserable and slovenly
dressed one...
How about miserable but well turned out versus fat and slovenly but
friendly?
Post by abelard
those who aspire, naturally were upset by her departure...
<translates: wimmin and gay men>
abelard
2007-08-31 20:11:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by joeh
Post by abelard
Post by FACE
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 16:21:22 +0200, in uk.politics.misc abelard
Post by abelard
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 10:44:28 +0200, "John of Aix"
Post by John of Aix
Post by Roger Dewhurst
What load of touchy-feely PC nonsense.
That seems like a pretty good analysis to me.
and now we have another pair of bitter old men on parade
sorry....on slouch
When Diana died, George Will wrote in regard to the orgiastic outpouring of grief
that in a year, everyone would look back and ask "now what was that all about'.
I think he was right...............
There was also a similar rending and sackcloth response to the beheading of Kenneth
Bigley to the point of embarrassment for many.
I think that 'send a teddy bear' has become a bit of a sarcastic joke. (One almost
on par with 'if it saves one child' which you may have seen was actually used in
seriousness in a post here yesterday.)
oh, the 'outpouring' is pretty obvious and natural...
a matter of identification with an intelligent, sensitive and not ugly
female who escaped the control of a dull, unimaginative, ugly oaf
<takes out and peels small onion>
Post by abelard
a person in a position of fame who independently bothered with the
oppressed despite her own difficulties....
who tended to be able and bothered to present herself well....
<places violin under chin plays sentimental tune>
Post by abelard
which person makes you feel better at the cashout?
the friendly well turned out one...or the fat, miserable and slovenly
dressed one...
How about miserable but well turned out versus fat and slovenly but
friendly?
probably depends on whether you're blind or deaf

if you're both you could use your sense of smell

though doubtless you work by empathy and see into the values
of the inner soul.....and don't need any more mundane sense
at all
Post by joeh
Post by abelard
those who aspire, naturally were upset by her departure...
<translates: wimmin and gay men>
your misanthropy is not unexpected....
--
web site at www.abelard.org - news comment service, logic, economics
energy, education, politics, etc 1,552,396 document calls in year past
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
all that is necessary for [] walk quietly and carry
the triumph of evil is that [] a big stick.
good people do nothing [] trust actions not words
only when it's funny -- roger rabbit
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
joeh
2007-08-31 20:16:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by abelard
Post by joeh
Post by abelard
Post by FACE
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 16:21:22 +0200, in uk.politics.misc abelard
Post by abelard
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 10:44:28 +0200, "John of Aix"
Post by John of Aix
Post by Roger Dewhurst
What load of touchy-feely PC nonsense.
That seems like a pretty good analysis to me.
and now we have another pair of bitter old men on parade
sorry....on slouch
When Diana died, George Will wrote in regard to the orgiastic outpouring of grief
that in a year, everyone would look back and ask "now what was that all about'.
I think he was right...............
There was also a similar rending and sackcloth response to the beheading of Kenneth
Bigley to the point of embarrassment for many.
I think that 'send a teddy bear' has become a bit of a sarcastic joke. (One almost
on par with 'if it saves one child' which you may have seen was actually used in
seriousness in a post here yesterday.)
oh, the 'outpouring' is pretty obvious and natural...
a matter of identification with an intelligent, sensitive and not ugly
female who escaped the control of a dull, unimaginative, ugly oaf
<takes out and peels small onion>
Post by abelard
a person in a position of fame who independently bothered with the
oppressed despite her own difficulties....
who tended to be able and bothered to present herself well....
<places violin under chin plays sentimental tune>
Post by abelard
which person makes you feel better at the cashout?
the friendly well turned out one...or the fat, miserable and slovenly
dressed one...
How about miserable but well turned out versus fat and slovenly but
friendly?
probably depends on whether you're blind or deaf
if you're both you could use your sense of smell
though doubtless you work by empathy and see into the values
of the inner soul.....and don't need any more mundane sense
at all
That sounds like Princess Di! Personally I take people as I find
them, as individuals rather than as socio-economic groupings.
Post by abelard
Post by joeh
Post by abelard
those who aspire, naturally were upset by her departure...
<translates: wimmin and gay men>
your misanthropy is not unexpected....
So are you a wimmin or a gay man?
abelard
2007-08-31 20:36:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by joeh
Post by abelard
Post by joeh
Post by abelard
Post by FACE
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 16:21:22 +0200, in uk.politics.misc abelard
Post by abelard
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 10:44:28 +0200, "John of Aix"
Post by John of Aix
Post by Roger Dewhurst
What load of touchy-feely PC nonsense.
That seems like a pretty good analysis to me.
and now we have another pair of bitter old men on parade
sorry....on slouch
When Diana died, George Will wrote in regard to the orgiastic outpouring of grief
that in a year, everyone would look back and ask "now what was that all about'.
I think he was right...............
There was also a similar rending and sackcloth response to the beheading of Kenneth
Bigley to the point of embarrassment for many.
I think that 'send a teddy bear' has become a bit of a sarcastic joke. (One almost
on par with 'if it saves one child' which you may have seen was actually used in
seriousness in a post here yesterday.)
oh, the 'outpouring' is pretty obvious and natural...
a matter of identification with an intelligent, sensitive and not ugly
female who escaped the control of a dull, unimaginative, ugly oaf
<takes out and peels small onion>
Post by abelard
a person in a position of fame who independently bothered with the
oppressed despite her own difficulties....
who tended to be able and bothered to present herself well....
<places violin under chin plays sentimental tune>
Post by abelard
which person makes you feel better at the cashout?
the friendly well turned out one...or the fat, miserable and slovenly
dressed one...
How about miserable but well turned out versus fat and slovenly but
friendly?
probably depends on whether you're blind or deaf
if you're both you could use your sense of smell
though doubtless you work by empathy and see into the values
of the inner soul.....and don't need any more mundane sense
at all
That sounds like Princess Di! Personally I take people as I find
them, as individuals rather than as socio-economic groupings.
Post by abelard
Post by joeh
Post by abelard
those who aspire, naturally were upset by her departure...
<translates: wimmin and gay men>
your misanthropy is not unexpected....
So are you a wimmin or a gay man?
i'm an elitist
--
web site at www.abelard.org - news comment service, logic, economics
energy, education, politics, etc 1,552,396 document calls in year past
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
all that is necessary for [] walk quietly and carry
the triumph of evil is that [] a big stick.
good people do nothing [] trust actions not words
only when it's funny -- roger rabbit
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
joeh
2007-08-31 21:51:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by abelard
Post by joeh
Post by abelard
Post by joeh
Post by abelard
Post by FACE
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 16:21:22 +0200, in uk.politics.misc abelard
Post by abelard
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 10:44:28 +0200, "John of Aix"
Post by John of Aix
Post by Roger Dewhurst
What load of touchy-feely PC nonsense.
That seems like a pretty good analysis to me.
and now we have another pair of bitter old men on parade
sorry....on slouch
When Diana died, George Will wrote in regard to the orgiastic outpouring of grief
that in a year, everyone would look back and ask "now what was that all about'.
I think he was right...............
There was also a similar rending and sackcloth response to the beheading of Kenneth
Bigley to the point of embarrassment for many.
I think that 'send a teddy bear' has become a bit of a sarcastic joke. (One almost
on par with 'if it saves one child' which you may have seen was actually used in
seriousness in a post here yesterday.)
oh, the 'outpouring' is pretty obvious and natural...
a matter of identification with an intelligent, sensitive and not ugly
female who escaped the control of a dull, unimaginative, ugly oaf
<takes out and peels small onion>
Post by abelard
a person in a position of fame who independently bothered with the
oppressed despite her own difficulties....
who tended to be able and bothered to present herself well....
<places violin under chin plays sentimental tune>
Post by abelard
which person makes you feel better at the cashout?
the friendly well turned out one...or the fat, miserable and slovenly
dressed one...
How about miserable but well turned out versus fat and slovenly but
friendly?
probably depends on whether you're blind or deaf
if you're both you could use your sense of smell
though doubtless you work by empathy and see into the values
of the inner soul.....and don't need any more mundane sense
at all
That sounds like Princess Di! Personally I take people as I find
them, as individuals rather than as socio-economic groupings.
Post by abelard
Post by joeh
Post by abelard
those who aspire, naturally were upset by her departure...
<translates: wimmin and gay men>
your misanthropy is not unexpected....
So are you a wimmin or a gay man?
i'm an elitist
An elitist wimmin or an elitist gay man?
abelard
2007-08-31 22:18:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by joeh
Post by abelard
Post by joeh
Post by abelard
Post by joeh
Post by abelard
Post by FACE
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 16:21:22 +0200, in uk.politics.misc abelard
Post by abelard
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 10:44:28 +0200, "John of Aix"
Post by John of Aix
Post by Roger Dewhurst
What load of touchy-feely PC nonsense.
That seems like a pretty good analysis to me.
and now we have another pair of bitter old men on parade
sorry....on slouch
When Diana died, George Will wrote in regard to the orgiastic outpouring of grief
that in a year, everyone would look back and ask "now what was that all about'.
I think he was right...............
There was also a similar rending and sackcloth response to the beheading of Kenneth
Bigley to the point of embarrassment for many.
I think that 'send a teddy bear' has become a bit of a sarcastic joke. (One almost
on par with 'if it saves one child' which you may have seen was actually used in
seriousness in a post here yesterday.)
oh, the 'outpouring' is pretty obvious and natural...
a matter of identification with an intelligent, sensitive and not ugly
female who escaped the control of a dull, unimaginative, ugly oaf
<takes out and peels small onion>
Post by abelard
a person in a position of fame who independently bothered with the
oppressed despite her own difficulties....
who tended to be able and bothered to present herself well....
<places violin under chin plays sentimental tune>
Post by abelard
which person makes you feel better at the cashout?
the friendly well turned out one...or the fat, miserable and slovenly
dressed one...
How about miserable but well turned out versus fat and slovenly but
friendly?
probably depends on whether you're blind or deaf
if you're both you could use your sense of smell
though doubtless you work by empathy and see into the values
of the inner soul.....and don't need any more mundane sense
at all
That sounds like Princess Di! Personally I take people as I find
them, as individuals rather than as socio-economic groupings.
Post by abelard
Post by joeh
Post by abelard
those who aspire, naturally were upset by her departure...
<translates: wimmin and gay men>
your misanthropy is not unexpected....
So are you a wimmin or a gay man?
i'm an elitist
An elitist wimmin or an elitist gay man?
among others i have babydriver and raisa in the q ahead of you
--
web site at www.abelard.org - news comment service, logic, economics
energy, education, politics, etc 1,552,396 document calls in year past
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
all that is necessary for [] walk quietly and carry
the triumph of evil is that [] a big stick.
good people do nothing [] trust actions not words
only when it's funny -- roger rabbit
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
crazyhorse
2007-09-01 07:55:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by abelard
Post by joeh
Post by abelard
i'm an elitist
An elitist wimmin or an elitist gay man?
among others i have babydriver and raisa in the q ahead of you
And you dont make any sense most of the time, either.
j***@hushmail.com
2007-09-01 08:55:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by abelard
Post by joeh
Post by abelard
Post by joeh
Post by abelard
Post by joeh
Post by abelard
Post by FACE
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 16:21:22 +0200, in uk.politics.misc abelard
Post by abelard
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 10:44:28 +0200, "John of Aix"
Post by John of Aix
Post by Roger Dewhurst
What load of touchy-feely PC nonsense.
That seems like a pretty good analysis to me.
and now we have another pair of bitter old men on parade
sorry....on slouch
When Diana died, George Will wrote in regard to the orgiastic outpouring of grief
that in a year, everyone would look back and ask "now what was that all about'.
I think he was right...............
There was also a similar rending and sackcloth response to the beheading of Kenneth
Bigley to the point of embarrassment for many.
I think that 'send a teddy bear' has become a bit of a sarcastic joke. (One almost
on par with 'if it saves one child' which you may have seen was actually used in
seriousness in a post here yesterday.)
oh, the 'outpouring' is pretty obvious and natural...
a matter of identification with an intelligent, sensitive and not ugly
female who escaped the control of a dull, unimaginative, ugly oaf
<takes out and peels small onion>
Post by abelard
a person in a position of fame who independently bothered with the
oppressed despite her own difficulties....
who tended to be able and bothered to present herself well....
<places violin under chin plays sentimental tune>
Post by abelard
which person makes you feel better at the cashout?
the friendly well turned out one...or the fat, miserable and slovenly
dressed one...
How about miserable but well turned out versus fat and slovenly but
friendly?
probably depends on whether you're blind or deaf
if you're both you could use your sense of smell
though doubtless you work by empathy and see into the values
of the inner soul.....and don't need any more mundane sense
at all
That sounds like Princess Di! Personally I take people as I find
them, as individuals rather than as socio-economic groupings.
Post by abelard
Post by joeh
Post by abelard
those who aspire, naturally were upset by her departure...
<translates: wimmin and gay men>
your misanthropy is not unexpected....
So are you a wimmin or a gay man?
i'm an elitist
An elitist wimmin or an elitist gay man?
among others i have babydriver and raisa in the q ahead of you
Why do you interpret a simple request for information as a sexual
overture?
abelard
2007-09-01 11:56:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@hushmail.com
Post by abelard
Post by joeh
Post by abelard
Post by joeh
Post by abelard
Post by joeh
Post by abelard
Post by FACE
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 16:21:22 +0200, in uk.politics.misc abelard
Post by abelard
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 10:44:28 +0200, "John of Aix"
Post by John of Aix
Post by Roger Dewhurst
What load of touchy-feely PC nonsense.
That seems like a pretty good analysis to me.
and now we have another pair of bitter old men on parade
sorry....on slouch
When Diana died, George Will wrote in regard to the orgiastic outpouring of grief
that in a year, everyone would look back and ask "now what was that all about'.
I think he was right...............
There was also a similar rending and sackcloth response to the beheading of Kenneth
Bigley to the point of embarrassment for many.
I think that 'send a teddy bear' has become a bit of a sarcastic joke. (One almost
on par with 'if it saves one child' which you may have seen was actually used in
seriousness in a post here yesterday.)
oh, the 'outpouring' is pretty obvious and natural...
a matter of identification with an intelligent, sensitive and not ugly
female who escaped the control of a dull, unimaginative, ugly oaf
<takes out and peels small onion>
Post by abelard
a person in a position of fame who independently bothered with the
oppressed despite her own difficulties....
who tended to be able and bothered to present herself well....
<places violin under chin plays sentimental tune>
Post by abelard
which person makes you feel better at the cashout?
the friendly well turned out one...or the fat, miserable and slovenly
dressed one...
How about miserable but well turned out versus fat and slovenly but
friendly?
probably depends on whether you're blind or deaf
if you're both you could use your sense of smell
though doubtless you work by empathy and see into the values
of the inner soul.....and don't need any more mundane sense
at all
That sounds like Princess Di! Personally I take people as I find
them, as individuals rather than as socio-economic groupings.
Post by abelard
Post by joeh
Post by abelard
those who aspire, naturally were upset by her departure...
<translates: wimmin and gay men>
your misanthropy is not unexpected....
So are you a wimmin or a gay man?
i'm an elitist
An elitist wimmin or an elitist gay man?
among others i have babydriver and raisa in the q ahead of you
Why do you interpret a simple request for information as a sexual
overture?
i'm deeply sorry...i couldn't imagine any other reason for
your persistent interest

i still can't.....
c'mon, you can 'fess up.....
--
web site at www.abelard.org - news comment service, logic, economics
energy, education, politics, etc 1,552,396 document calls in year past
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
all that is necessary for [] walk quietly and carry
the triumph of evil is that [] a big stick.
good people do nothing [] trust actions not words
only when it's funny -- roger rabbit
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
jb
2007-09-01 12:49:21 UTC
Permalink
"abelard" <***@abelard.org> wrote in message > i'm deeply sorry...i
couldn't imagine any other reason for
Post by abelard
your persistent interest
i still can't.....
c'mon, you can 'fess up.....
Hark who's talking:-))
your persistent interest
j***@hushmail.com
2007-09-01 12:58:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by abelard
Post by j***@hushmail.com
Post by abelard
Post by joeh
Post by abelard
Post by joeh
Post by abelard
Post by joeh
Post by abelard
Post by FACE
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 16:21:22 +0200, in uk.politics.misc abelard
Post by abelard
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 10:44:28 +0200, "John of Aix"
Post by John of Aix
Post by Roger Dewhurst
What load of touchy-feely PC nonsense.
That seems like a pretty good analysis to me.
and now we have another pair of bitter old men on parade
sorry....on slouch
When Diana died, George Will wrote in regard to the orgiastic outpouring of grief
that in a year, everyone would look back and ask "now what was that all about'.
I think he was right...............
There was also a similar rending and sackcloth response to the beheading of Kenneth
Bigley to the point of embarrassment for many.
I think that 'send a teddy bear' has become a bit of a sarcastic joke. (One almost
on par with 'if it saves one child' which you may have seen was actually used in
seriousness in a post here yesterday.)
oh, the 'outpouring' is pretty obvious and natural...
a matter of identification with an intelligent, sensitive and not ugly
female who escaped the control of a dull, unimaginative, ugly oaf
<takes out and peels small onion>
Post by abelard
a person in a position of fame who independently bothered with the
oppressed despite her own difficulties....
who tended to be able and bothered to present herself well....
<places violin under chin plays sentimental tune>
Post by abelard
which person makes you feel better at the cashout?
the friendly well turned out one...or the fat, miserable and slovenly
dressed one...
How about miserable but well turned out versus fat and slovenly but
friendly?
probably depends on whether you're blind or deaf
if you're both you could use your sense of smell
though doubtless you work by empathy and see into the values
of the inner soul.....and don't need any more mundane sense
at all
That sounds like Princess Di! Personally I take people as I find
them, as individuals rather than as socio-economic groupings.
Post by abelard
Post by joeh
Post by abelard
those who aspire, naturally were upset by her departure...
<translates: wimmin and gay men>
your misanthropy is not unexpected....
So are you a wimmin or a gay man?
i'm an elitist
An elitist wimmin or an elitist gay man?
among others i have babydriver and raisa in the q ahead of you
Why do you interpret a simple request for information as a sexual
overture?
i'm deeply sorry...i couldn't imagine any other reason for
your persistent interest
i still can't.....
c'mon, you can 'fess up.....
Just idle curiosity/nosiness.
abelard
2007-09-01 13:29:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@hushmail.com
Post by abelard
i'm deeply sorry...i couldn't imagine any other reason for
your persistent interest
i still can't.....
c'mon, you can 'fess up.....
Just idle curiosity/nosiness.
i'll pretend to be convinced....
i see you have babydriver twitching again which can't be all bad

i just don't really want you fighting over me.....better that i treat
my various suitors with solicitous care and determined equality..
--
web site at www.abelard.org - news comment service, logic, economics
energy, education, politics, etc 1,552,396 document calls in year past
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
all that is necessary for [] walk quietly and carry
the triumph of evil is that [] a big stick.
good people do nothing [] trust actions not words
only when it's funny -- roger rabbit
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Roger Dewhurst
2007-08-31 20:35:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by abelard
Post by joeh
Post by FACE
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 16:21:22 +0200, in uk.politics.misc abelard
Post by abelard
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 10:44:28 +0200, "John of Aix"
<translates: wimmin and gay men>
your misanthropy is not unexpected....
Are you a poofter? That might just explain a few things.

R

R
abelard
2007-08-31 20:38:09 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 1 Sep 2007 08:35:50 +1200, "Roger Dewhurst"
Post by Roger Dewhurst
Post by abelard
Post by joeh
Post by FACE
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 16:21:22 +0200, in uk.politics.misc abelard
Post by abelard
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 10:44:28 +0200, "John of Aix"
<translates: wimmin and gay men>
your misanthropy is not unexpected....
Are you a poofter? That might just explain a few things.
i prefer yaks....i thought that was public knowledge
--
web site at www.abelard.org - news comment service, logic, economics
energy, education, politics, etc 1,552,396 document calls in year past
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
all that is necessary for [] walk quietly and carry
the triumph of evil is that [] a big stick.
good people do nothing [] trust actions not words
only when it's funny -- roger rabbit
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Alf
2007-08-31 08:41:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy
Repercussions of the death of Diana, Princess of Wales
As I write this it is almost precisely ten years since the death of
Diana, Princess of Wales. Some say it is time for Britain to "get
over" this- but without wanting to sound sentimental, I don't believe
as a nation we ever will.
What made Diana unique amongst her generation was her ability to
transcend traditional divides, such as class, ethnicity, religion and
disability. One of the very few people able to "walk with kings but
keep the common touch". Though deeply flawed, and perhaps because of
it, she somehow managed to embody the aspirations of the country in a
single person. No one since has managed to fill this "keystone"
identity, a crucial part of uniting a diverse population.
The mystery surrounding her death has similar repercussions. Whatever
views one holds on this, from tragic accident to assassination, one
thing is certain. A lot of people no longer trust the establishment's
version of events, and while this is not necessarily a bad thing in
itself, the knock on effect has been a loss of trust in people in
general. It is after all, trust, that binds a civilised society
together.
This situation in many ways echoes the effects seen in America
following the shooting of John F Kennedy. What was lost on 31st August
1997 was not just a charismatic personality, but a nation's innocence.
The above is an excellent example of how sentiment distorts facts.
People reading this sort of stuff many years from now will be given the
impression she was some sort of saint. Really very strange? Never "get
over it" FFS!
Nobody
2007-08-31 09:24:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy
Repercussions of the death of Diana, Princess of Wales
As I write this it is almost precisely ten years since the death of
Diana, Princess of Wales. Some say it is time for Britain to "get
over" this- but without wanting to sound sentimental, I don't believe
as a nation we ever will.
What made Diana unique amongst her generation was her ability to
transcend traditional divides, such as class, ethnicity, religion and
disability. One of the very few people able to "walk with kings but
keep the common touch". Though deeply flawed, and perhaps because of
it, she somehow managed to embody the aspirations of the country in a
single person. No one since has managed to fill this "keystone"
identity, a crucial part of uniting a diverse population.
The mystery surrounding her death has similar repercussions. Whatever
views one holds on this, from tragic accident to assassination, one
thing is certain. A lot of people no longer trust the establishment's
version of events, and while this is not necessarily a bad thing in
itself, the knock on effect has been a loss of trust in people in
general. It is after all, trust, that binds a civilised society
together.
This situation in many ways echoes the effects seen in America
following the shooting of John F Kennedy. What was lost on 31st August
1997 was not just a charismatic personality, but a nation's innocence.
I got "over it" about ten years ago.

Diana was an expensive clothes horse brought in by the Windsors to
produce a heir and a spare.
Nas ne dogonjat
2007-08-31 09:49:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nobody
Post by Andy
Repercussions of the death of Diana, Princess of Wales
As I write this it is almost precisely ten years since the death of
Diana, Princess of Wales. Some say it is time for Britain to "get
over" this- but without wanting to sound sentimental, I don't believe
as a nation we ever will.
What made Diana unique amongst her generation was her ability to
transcend traditional divides, such as class, ethnicity, religion and
disability. One of the very few people able to "walk with kings but
keep the common touch". Though deeply flawed, and perhaps because of
it, she somehow managed to embody the aspirations of the country in a
single person. No one since has managed to fill this "keystone"
identity, a crucial part of uniting a diverse population.
The mystery surrounding her death has similar repercussions. Whatever
views one holds on this, from tragic accident to assassination, one
thing is certain. A lot of people no longer trust the establishment's
version of events, and while this is not necessarily a bad thing in
itself, the knock on effect has been a loss of trust in people in
general. It is after all, trust, that binds a civilised society
together.
This situation in many ways echoes the effects seen in America
following the shooting of John F Kennedy. What was lost on 31st August
1997 was not just a charismatic personality, but a nation's innocence.
I got "over it" about ten years ago.
Diana was an expensive clothes horse brought in by the Windsors to
produce a heir and a spare.
exactly, who the fuck else wanted to marry old 'big ears'
crazyhorse
2007-08-31 11:57:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nas ne dogonjat
Post by Nobody
Diana was an expensive clothes horse brought in by the Windsors to
produce a heir and a spare.
exactly, who the fuck else wanted to marry old 'big ears'
Camilla, it would seem.

Anyway, the Windsors got what they wanted which was to introduce some
less inbred DNA into their family line, and then Diana became
dispensable. The child of a Charles/Camilla liason would be horror
most people might prefer not to think about.
Kamel Tow
2007-08-31 12:06:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by crazyhorse
Post by Nas ne dogonjat
Post by Nobody
Diana was an expensive clothes horse brought in by the Windsors to
produce a heir and a spare.
exactly, who the fuck else wanted to marry old 'big ears'
Camilla, it would seem.
exactly, and they needed a baby machine....
William Black
2007-08-31 12:07:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by crazyhorse
Post by Nas ne dogonjat
Post by Nobody
Diana was an expensive clothes horse brought in by the Windsors to
produce a heir and a spare.
exactly, who the fuck else wanted to marry old 'big ears'
Camilla, it would seem.
Anyway, the Windsors got what they wanted which was to introduce some
less inbred DNA into their family line, and then Diana became
dispensable. The child of a Charles/Camilla liason would be horror
most people might prefer not to think about.
The Spencers less inbred than the Windsors!

Good grief man, she had a better claim to the throne than he has.

The Spencers have specialised in breeding things royalty like to take into
their beds for centuries.

Look up the names of Edward II's boyfriends.
--
William Black


I've seen things you people wouldn't believe.
Barbeques on fire by the chalets past the castle headland
I watched the gift shops glitter in the darkness off the Newborough gate
All these moments will be lost in time, like icecream on the beach
Time for tea.
Ariadne
2007-08-31 23:52:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Black
Post by crazyhorse
Post by Nas ne dogonjat
Post by Nobody
Diana was an expensive clothes horse brought in by the Windsors to
produce a heir and a spare.
exactly, who the fuck else wanted to marry old 'big ears'
Camilla, it would seem.
Anyway, the Windsors got what they wanted which was to introduce some
less inbred DNA into their family line, and then Diana became
dispensable. The child of a Charles/Camilla liason would be horror
most people might prefer not to think about.
The Spencers less inbred than the Windsors!
Good grief man, she had a better claim to the throne than he has.
The Spencers have specialised in breeding things royalty like to take into
their beds for centuries.
Look up the names of Edward II's boyfriends.
--
William Black
I've seen things you people wouldn't believe.
Barbeques on fire by the chalets past the castle headland
I watched the gift shops glitter in the darkness off the Newborough gate
All these moments will be lost in time, like icecream on the beach
Time for tea.
I read that the reason for Spencer's purple speech
at the funeral was that the Spencers look down on
the "Windsors".
Jay
2007-08-31 09:33:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy
Repercussions of the death of Diana, Princess of Wales
As I write this it is almost precisely ten years since the death of
Diana, Princess of Wales. Some say it is time for Britain to "get
over" this- but without wanting to sound sentimental, I don't believe
as a nation we ever will.
What made Diana unique amongst her generation was her ability to
transcend traditional divides, such as class, ethnicity, religion and
disability. One of the very few people able to "walk with kings but
keep the common touch". Though deeply flawed, and perhaps because of
it, she somehow managed to embody the aspirations of the country in a
single person. No one since has managed to fill this "keystone"
identity, a crucial part of uniting a diverse population.
The mystery surrounding her death has similar repercussions. Whatever
views one holds on this, from tragic accident to assassination, one
thing is certain. A lot of people no longer trust the establishment's
version of events, and while this is not necessarily a bad thing in
itself, the knock on effect has been a loss of trust in people in
general. It is after all, trust, that binds a civilised society
together.
This situation in many ways echoes the effects seen in America
following the shooting of John F Kennedy. What was lost on 31st August
1997 was not just a charismatic personality, but a nation's innocence.
My enduring memory is that they cancelled
Liverpool v Newcastle that day.
I got over Dianas death by lunch time, ten years ago.
Nas ne dogonjat
2007-08-31 09:36:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy
Repercussions of the death of Diana, Princess of Wales
As I write this it is almost precisely ten years since the death of
Diana, Princess of Wales. Some say it is time for Britain to "get
over" this- but without wanting to sound sentimental, I don't believe
as a nation we ever will.
What made Diana unique amongst her generation was her ability to
transcend traditional divides, such as class, ethnicity, religion and
disability. One of the very few people able to "walk with kings but
keep the common touch". Though deeply flawed, and perhaps because of
it, she somehow managed to embody the aspirations of the country in a
single person. No one since has managed to fill this "keystone"
identity, a crucial part of uniting a diverse population.
The mystery surrounding her death has similar repercussions. Whatever
views one holds on this, from tragic accident to assassination, one
thing is certain. A lot of people no longer trust the establishment's
version of events, and while this is not necessarily a bad thing in
itself, the knock on effect has been a loss of trust in people in
general. It is after all, trust, that binds a civilised society
together.
This situation in many ways echoes the effects seen in America
following the shooting of John F Kennedy. What was lost on 31st August
1997 was not just a charismatic personality, but a nation's innocence.
what a load of bollocks
Andrew Thomas
2007-08-31 09:55:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy
Repercussions of the death of Diana, Princess of Wales
As I write this it is almost precisely ten years since the death of
Diana, Princess of Wales. Some say it is time for Britain to "get
over" this- but without wanting to sound sentimental, I don't believe
as a nation we ever will.
What made Diana unique amongst her generation was her ability to
transcend traditional divides, such as class, ethnicity, religion and
disability. One of the very few people able to "walk with kings but
keep the common touch". Though deeply flawed, and perhaps because of
it, she somehow managed to embody the aspirations of the country in a
single person. No one since has managed to fill this "keystone"
identity, a crucial part of uniting a diverse population.
The mystery surrounding her death has similar repercussions. Whatever
views one holds on this, from tragic accident to assassination, one
thing is certain. A lot of people no longer trust the establishment's
version of events
Indeed - Mo al-Fayed, his immediate family and probably several of his
lawyers too. Ha ha ha :)
Post by Andy
and while this is not necessarily a bad thing in
itself, the knock on effect has been a loss of trust in people in
general. It is after all, trust, that binds a civilised society
together.
This situation in many ways echoes the effects seen in America
following the shooting of John F Kennedy. What was lost on 31st August
1997 was not just a charismatic personality, but a nation's innocence.
What a pile of cock. This "nation", such as it is, lost its innocence
in the umpteen wars it's had with its neighbours in the last thousand
years. This isn't some upbeat 10-minute-old ex-colony. If you were
to argue thta history began at the beginning of the 20th century, as
many do, I'd say the country lost its innocence in the battle of the
Somme, or at the very least during the four years of aerial
bombardment by the Germans and ten years of rationing following the
second war to have ravaged the country. Diana? FFS.
jb
2007-08-31 11:33:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy
Repercussions of the death of Diana, Princess of Wales
As I write this it is almost precisely ten years since the death of
Diana, Princess of Wales. Some say it is time for Britain to "get
over" this- but without wanting to sound sentimental, I don't believe
as a nation we ever will.
What made Diana unique amongst her generation was her ability to
transcend traditional divides, such as class, ethnicity, religion and
disability. One of the very few people able to "walk with kings but
keep the common touch". Though deeply flawed, and perhaps because of
it, she somehow managed to embody the aspirations of the country in a
single person. No one since has managed to fill this "keystone"
identity, a crucial part of uniting a diverse population.
The mystery surrounding her death has similar repercussions. Whatever
views one holds on this, from tragic accident to assassination, one
thing is certain. A lot of people no longer trust the establishment's
version of events, and while this is not necessarily a bad thing in
itself, the knock on effect has been a loss of trust in people in
general. It is after all, trust, that binds a civilised society
together.
This situation in many ways echoes the effects seen in America
following the shooting of John F Kennedy. What was lost on 31st August
1997 was not just a charismatic personality, but a nation's innocence.
I can see what it is you are trying to say!

She was a self centred uppercrust tart.

There you go, that wasn't so hard.

See what you can do when you try? :-))
Andy
2007-08-31 12:28:43 UTC
Permalink
The death of Princess Diana (also known as Lady Diana) was a shock
felt around the world. But within days, certainly weeks, shock laughs
were also going around the world as office workers swapped "Diana
Jokes," e-mailers sent them to each other, and various websites
proudly vied for having "the most" or "the best" collection of them.

Lenny Bruce once said that comedy is tragedy plus time. Today, comedy
is tragedy plus a minute.

Why? Perhaps we don't have as much time for grief as before. Perhaps
we have all gotten so used to the world's circus of horrors that
clowning comes more quickly. Some suggest that "sick" humor is
actually healthy, since it's a release from sorrow and prevents us
from taking anything too seriously.

Some dark humorists immediately began concocting these jokes because
they saw a lot of hypocrisy at work. Only a week before, people were
outraged at Diana for frolicking with a rich, greasy Arab playboy (as
people were outraged at Jacqueline Kennedy for marrying a rich, greasy
Greek for money). They saw pictures of "Dodi and Di" in the tabloids
and were "disgusted" that she wasn't with her kids instead.

But once she died, these same people decried the tabloids for hounding
her. They spread the rumor that her Arab playboy was actually her true
love. And Elton John re-wrote a tribute to Marilyn Monroe into a
tribute for Diana, which is a bit like stealing the wreath from one
funeral to bring to another.

Thus, the reaction of the masses provokes a dark humorist to make
light of tragedy, not necessarily in disrespect for someone who did
nobody harm and died under tragic and painful circumstances, but in
disgust at the hypocrisy surrounding the case. Some dark humorists
simply wish to prove to themselves, and others, that they are utterly
unmoved by the cruelities of fate and bitterly laugh because all life
ends in death and misery.

Below, are some Princess Diana jokes, riddles and songs. There have
been hundreds more, but (believe it or not) these are the wittiest of
the lot. Many were far more childish and cruel.

Yes, it may be more appropriate to play "Pavanne for a Dead Princess"
rather than publish puns about a dead princess. But...well, this IS an
awfully dark website...

THE JOKES THAT WENT AROUND WITHIN A MONTH OF DIANA'S DEATH...


What does Princess Di turn into at midnight?
The wall.

What was Princess Di's favorite cocktail?
Harvey Wallbangers with a couple of chasers.

What's the difference between a Mercedes and a Porsche?
Diana wouldn't be seen dead in a Porsche.

What's the difference between Mother Theresa and Princess Diana?
5 days.

Why was Elton John invited to the funeral?
So at least one old queen would be seen crying in public.

Why did Elton John perform at the funeral?
The Crash Test Dummies were unavailable.

Yesterday a ferryboat leaving Haiti capsized and drowned 300 people.
But a tragedy was avoided when they discovered that none of them on
board was a princess.

What does George Burns and Princess Diana have in common?
They both died when they hit 100.

What's harder than getting red wine off carpeting?
Getting Di off the upholstery.

What did Princess Diana die of?
Car-pole-tunnel syndrome.

Why is Nancy Reagan miffed at Princess Di?
Because Diana gets to wear the next Versace collection before Nancy
does.

Dodi wanted to go night-clubbing but Diana just wanted to crash.

What do you get a princess that has everything?
A seatbelt and an airbag.

What's the one thing that attracts Diana more than a wealthy Egyptian?
A solidly built Pole.

What does DIANA stand for?
Died In A Nasty Accident!
( Courtesy of RANDY RIPLEY, ***@netzero.com )
What does DODI stand for?
Died Opposite DI. (variations: Died Of Driver Intoxication, Died On
Dashboard Impact)

What did Prince Charles say when he heard about the automobile
accident?
Well, that's the way the Mercedes BENZ.

What does a bee have in common with a Mercedes?
They both make Royal Jelly.

Why is a Mercedes like a squid?
They've both got Di in them when they're opened.

What's the difference between a Mercedes and Princess Diana?
A Mercedes will easily reach 40.

You've read Fergie's books about "Budgie the Helicopter"?
Now read Diana's book, "Crunchie the dark blue Mercedes"

Hear about the new Mercedes?
It comes with two airbags and three bodybags.

What did Princess Diana do when she heard the driver had been
drinking?
She hit the roof.

What's the one word that could have saved Princess Diana's life?
Taxi!

Diana's new title: Princess of Walls

What do Lady Di and Pink Floyd have in common?
Their last greatest hit was the WALL.

The Driver turned to Dodi just as they were entering the tunnel and
said, "God I'm so tired! I cannot wait until my head hits the pillar
tonight"

What did the Queen say when she heard Princess Diana died in a car
smash?
Was Fergie with her?

Why did Di go to Paris?
To get smashed!

Have you heard that Princess Diana was on the radio?
And the dashboard, and the windscreen, and...

Did you hear that Diana had Blue eyes?
One blew out the left window and the other out the right window.

If Diana's heart was in the right place... why was it found in the
glove compartment?

Knock knock.
Who's there?
Di
Di who?
See, easily forgotten.

What's the similarity between Princess Di and a landmine?
They're both easy to lay but difficult to clear up.

Prince Charles was out early the other day walking the dog.When a
passer-by said "Morning", Charles said "No, just walking the dog."

When Prince Charles was told of Diana's death he was all ears.

What has 500 legs and 62 teeth?
The front row at Princess Diana's funeral.

What's the difference between the London Ritz and the Paris Ritz?
You get mints after dinner at the London Ritz and minced after dinner
at the Paris Ritz.

Did Dodi do Di before Di and Dodi died?

Did you know Di was on drugs?
Speed, then smack.

What did Princess Di say to Dodi after he gave her an engagement ring?
Aren't we moving a bit to fast!

I say, why couldn't the paparazzi develop the crash photos?
There was bloody Di all over them!

Did you know that when they pulled Dodi out of the car his penis was a
funny colour.
They say it had been dipped in Di.

What's Diana's newest title?
The Lady in Red.

Diana: dead as a Dodi.

The way it happened... someone yelled "Lady Di" and the driver thought
it was an order.

Did you hear that Di is going to get married again?
They say its a match made in heaven.

Candle in the Wind

Goodbye Princess Di
May they all forget you were a tart
And have the grace to shed a tear
Before the rumours start

You went out of the country
And you tried to hide in vain
They saw you in the tabloids
You really should have changed your name

But it seems to me your driver was
Over three sheets to the wind
Never knowing what had happened
When the roof fell in

And I'd have liked to have seen the photo
But then I'm just a lout
Your minder will die of heart disease
Before the truth gets out

Royalty was tough
Those regal ears without a dick
Imagine bedding that one night
We can see you had to split

And 'specially now you're dead
Oh the Brits are all contrite
But when you were alive
They really couldn't give a shite

Goodbye Princess Di
From the young man who doesn't want to know
Who thinks you've run off to the Caribbean
To live with Marilyn Monroe
(and JFK, Elvis Presley, Jim Morrison, Hendrix, Luther
King, Maxwell et al.)

Leader of the Pack

He met her at the lingerie store
She said charlie didnt love her anymore
That's when she fell for dodi el-fayed

The royal family was always putting her down, down down
The Queen mum said that di spent too much on gowns
Charlie was such a mama's boy
he always loved Camilla anyway
that's why Di fell for Dodi el fayed

She heard that Charlie found someone knew
and that he and Di were all through
Prince Charlie was a bum
and Princess Di wasn't so dumb
that's why she fell for Dodi el fayed.

His mum was always putting her down
Charlie liked to play around
He should have had it made
Princess Di was one hot babe
that's why she fell for Dodi El fayed

(from station WCSB 89.3 Cleveland)

Ballad of Jed Clampett - The theme from the Beverly Hillbillies

This is a story about Dodi and Di
they were eating at the Ritz and he felt her thigh
said my chateau is where we outta be
So they got in the Mercedes and drove crazily
Benz that is
Paris France
home of escarots and truffles

she got so excited she almost up-chucked her food
and the people at the Ritz would have thought that was rude
Please poke me Dodi, I ain't no prude
take me to your chateau, and you can see me nude
so they piled in the Mercedes,
she and her dude
French kissing in France beneath the Paris moon

Well the first thing you know Di gave Chuck the air
Her and Dodi made a real lovely pair
He caressed her tenderly and she didnt have a care
he ran his fingers throught her golden hair
and said her tits looked like little pairs
Anjou, that is
Anjou, France
and kisses sweeter than wine

Well , their wedding would have been a lovely sight
it's too bad that the driver was tight
He drove left but the car went right
into the tunnel in the middle of the night
by the Seine
3 lives down the drain
and the princess screaming in pain

(from WCSB 89.3 Cleveland)


PRINCESS DIANA SONG
(Don McLean)

Bye, bye, driver, Dodi and Di
Drove my Merc to the tunnel but paparazzi were nigh
And good old driver was drinking whisky and rye
Singing this'll be the day that we Di

Now Charles thought he was off scot free
But Camilla said "hey, how about me?"
And Will and Harry were sad as can be
The day the Princess died

Bye, bye, driver, Dodi and Di
Drove my Merc to the tunnel but paparazzi were nigh
And good old driver was drinking whisky and rye
Singing this'll be the day that we Di

Now Di died from a broken heart
Earl Spencer tore the press apart
And Elton's song was very smart
But still the people cried

And they were singing:
Bye, bye, driver, Dodi and Di
Drove my Merc to the tunnel but paparazzi were nigh
And good old driver was drinking whisky and rye
Singing this'll be the day that we Di
This'll be the day that we Diiiii...


What was the last thing Di said to Dodi?
'These paparazzi are driving me up the wall'

What was the last thing Diana said to the paparazzi?
No more pictures, I'm a bloody Princess!

What's the bumper sticker on Fergie's car?
I brake for Paparazzi.

What is the difference between leeches and the paparazzi?
Leeches fall off after you die.

Let's all memorialise the sainted Mother Teresa and the beloved
Princess Diana by eating curry and then sticking our fingers down our
throats.

Did the British Secret Service kill Princess Diana?
No, the French underground did it.

What's the difference between Diana and Tiger Woods?
Tiger Woods has a better driver.

Why don't you want to buy golf clubs at Harrods?
Their drivers suck.

A policeman at the scene was trying to take Diana's panties off. The
sergeant asked what he thought he was doing. He replied, "you told me
to measure the skid marks".

Why didn't Superman come and rescue Princess Diana?
Because he's a quadraplegic!

Diana's last words: 'Take me up the tunnel, make me scream!'

What are the last two things Dodi did?
Di

What would Diana be doing if she were alive today?
Trying to claw her way out of her coffin.

Princess Diana and Marilyn Monroe are summoned to the Pearly Gates.
St. Peter tells them there is only room for one famous blonde.
Marilyn exposes her breasts and says, "Look! These are the most
beautiful ones in God's creation, and he should be allowed to see them
every day for eternity."
St. Peter says "very nice", then turns to Princess Diana.
Diana lifts her dress, drops her knickers and douches with a bottle of
Perrier.
St. Peter says "Ok, Diana you can go in."
Marilyn is furious: "I show you the most beautiful breasts God has
ever created, and she performs a vulgar act and you let HER in?"
"I'm sorry," says Peter, "but a Royal Flush always beats a pair."

Is there a new title now for the Princess of Wales?
Princess of Walls.

What's the difference between Dodi and Di and Charles and Camilla?
With Dodi and Di it was just a crush

What's the difference between those who get offended by Princess Diana
jokes and a puppy?
The puppy eventually stops whining.
h***@freeispshares.co.uk
2007-08-31 12:48:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy
Repercussions of the death of Diana, Princess of Wales
As I write this it is almost precisely ten years since the death of
Diana, Princess of Wales. Some say it is time for Britain to "get
over" this- but without wanting to sound sentimental, I don't believe
as a nation we ever will.
What made Diana unique amongst her generation was her ability to
transcend traditional divides, such as class, ethnicity, religion and
disability. One of the very few people able to "walk with kings but
keep the common touch".
Charles does that.
Post by Andy
Though deeply flawed, and perhaps because of
it, she somehow managed to embody the aspirations of the country in a
single person.
What aspirations? Getting divorced and thereby leaving your
children? Tarting about with unsuitable men? Poisoning the monarchy?
Post by Andy
No one since has managed to fill this "keystone"
identity, a crucial part of uniting a diverse population.
Hardly. Driving a division between those revolted by incontinent
maudlin emotion and those who indulge in it.
Post by Andy
The mystery surrounding her death has similar repercussions. Whatever
views one holds on this, from tragic accident to assassination, one
thing is certain. A lot of people no longer trust the establishment's
version of events, and while this is not necessarily a bad thing in
itself, the knock on effect has been a loss of trust in people in
general. It is after all, trust, that binds a civilised society
together.
This situation in many ways echoes the effects seen in America
following the shooting of John F Kennedy. What was lost on 31st August
1997 was not just a charismatic personality, but a nation's innocence.
Oh come on!
norm
2007-08-31 16:20:10 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 30 Aug 2007 17:50:20 -0700, Andy
Post by Andy
Repercussions of the death of Diana, Princess of Wales
As I write this it is almost precisely ten years since the death of
snip

What these snivelling saddos cannot conceive is that the vast majority
of the population could not give a flying fuck.

Sure, it's always sad when someone dies before their time and I'm sure
she was a very nice lady, but there is nothing to get over.

norm
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